LabVIEW Project Library Files Say "Has Been Deleted, Renamed or Moved on Disk"

Updated Feb 21, 2019

Reported In

Software

  • LabVIEW

Issue Details

When expanding my project tree for my LabVIEW Project Library (.lvlib) file, I have several items that state Warning: has been deleted, renamed or moved on disk. With standard LabVIEW projects, I would go to Project >> Resolve Conflicts, but that option is greyed out for me. How do I re-associate these files with their correct locations?

Solution

A project library file does not contain the actual files it references. The files will be on the disk where they were originally saved. This conflict is occurring because some (or all) of the files are currently in a location that LabVIEW does not expect. To resolve this, go to the Files tab of the Project Explorer window. Most likely, there is more than one location listed with subfolders containing the library items. You will need to move all of those items into the location that LabVIEW expects them to be in, typically a subfolder of the user.lib directory (by default, at C:\Program Files\National Instruments\LabVIEW 20xx\user.lib). Once you move all of the files to this location, you should be able to go back to the Items tab of the Project Explorer window to see the items successfully.

Additional Information

Review the help document Organization of LabVIEW to know more about the structure of the LabVIEW file system on Windows, Mac OS X, and Linux; as well as for suggested location for saving files when working with the development environment.

If your see that your files are in the correct directory. You should feel free to just remove the warning and continue development. 

If you are using subVIs that call into files in the Library, try opening each subVI directly from Windows Explorer and managing their individual dependencies. If a subVI has changes to an associated library or file, that will carry over if the subVI is then added to a new LabVIEW Project. 

Other options you can try to get your files together are:

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